Skip to main content

Environment

Asset Maintenance

A well-maintained port is usually an indicator of a well-managed port. The Harbour Master will work with the port's engineers and maintenance department to ensure that infrastructure and assets essential for marine operations are maintained and fit for purpose. Major infrastructure and smaller assets should be recorded in an asset register, inspected periodically and be subject to planned maintenance.

Effective adaptation of port assets and infrastructure to climate change, including rising sea levels and increasing storminess, is essential for business continuity and safety management. Guidance on climate change adaptation is available from PIANC.

Port Approach and Fairways

Navigable channels are the arteries of a port. They must have adequate depth and width for the maximum size of vessels using the port. The regular survey of channels and the optimum placement of aids to navigation are among the primary responsibilities of ports and usually require the permission of a national lighthouse authority. Many ports, as Local Lighthouse Authorities under the national organisation, are responsible for the maintenance of Aids to Navigation in their area of jurisdiction.

Dredging and dredging regimes

The increasing size of ships is a challenge for ports which in order to remain competitive may need to increase the depth and breadth of their approach channels and berths. Dredging and the disposal of dredged material have become increasingly contentious due to potential environmental impacts. This can affect the timely development of port facilities.

Deep water routes, traffic separation schemes, anchor areas

Vessels optimize efficiency as they navigate between major ports. As a result shipping can be highly concentrated into modern sea-lanes. The presence of deep water routes and traffic separation schemes may increase the difficulty of safe port access for visiting vessels.

Hydrographic services

Ports are increasingly operating on reduced under-keel clearance margins due to increasing vessel size, which in turn requires more efficient hydrographic data and services. Ports need to be able to collect, process and publish data on port conditions in a timely manner and provide increasing amounts of meteorological and tidal data in real time.

Operation of bridges and locks

When locks and bridges are part of the port’s infrastructure there can be a conflict between the scheduling of ships and use of public access routes over locks and bridges. Maritime security must also be considered when roads and rail cross waterways used by ships.

Sustainability

With the increasing emphasis on environmental sustainability, many ports have responded to ensure that their operations are environmentally sustainable and committed themselves to working towards improved environmental performance through focused action on the following areas: air quality, energy conservation and climate change, waste management, noise management, and water (both consumption and quality) management.

Harbour Masters have a key role to play including the implementation of pollution-prevention measures and the development of contingency plans and responses to oil spills, dealing with the immediate effects of the oil spill and aiming to minimise the impact on the port’s customers and stakeholders.

Harbour Masters may control waste management services in ports, including the disposal of dangerous chemicals. Ballast water protocols aim to prevent the accidental introduction of exotic and potentially invasive aquatic organisms into ports in order to protect the marine environment.

A further environmental concern is the need to reduce greenhouse gases. Sources of air pollution within ports can be of concern because of the potential for harm to both port users and the health of people living close to the port.

Ship waste and ballast water

Waste management services in ports, including the disposal of dangerous chemicals, may be strictly controlled by the Harbour Master to ensure compliance with all relevant laws and regulations. IMO MEPC.1/Circ.834 15 April 2014 CONSOLIDATED GUIDANCE FOR PORT RECEPTION FACILITY PROVIDERS AND USERS is intended to be a practical users’ guide for ships’ crews who seek to deliver MARPOL residues/wastes ashore and for port reception facility providers who seek to provide timely and efficient port reception services to ships.

The International Convention for Control and Management of Ship’s Ballast Water and Sediments came into force in 2017 and represents a significant step in the protection of the marine environment. The IMO has developed a manual entitled "Ballast water management - how to do it" (ISBN 978-92-801-1681-6, sales number: I624E).

Bunkering of Fuel

Ships wishing to take on fuel, for instance HFO (Heavy Fuel Oil), MDO (Marine Diesel Oil), MGO (Marine Gas Oil) or LNG (Liquefied Natural Gas) must supply the grade, the quantity and the start and stop time of bunker operations. The master of the receiving ship and the skipper of the bunker barge must register the operation in a bunker oil record book. A ship / ship safety bunker checklist must be completed by both parties. This can be checked by the harbour master’s staff and bunker operations can be stopped if safety rules are not followed. The World Ports Climate Initiative has developed guidelines for safe procedures for bunkering of LNG. These can be found here  

Tank Cleaning

The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL) is the main international convention covering prevention of pollution of the marine environment by ships from operational or accidental causes. Annex I covers prevention of pollution by oil from operational measures as well as from accidental discharges. Ports and harbours must offer oil reception facilities for oil-water residues, slops and bilges. In accordance with rules for products specified in Annex II of the convention, shore reception facilities are required, because, for instance, category A products can only be discharged to a shore tank and cannot be pumped overboard. That is why there are terminals in a harbour where chemical tankers and product tankers can wash their tanks and send the wash waters ashore. Ventilation of ship tanks can also be a problem if toxic gases could be emitted into the atmosphere. Therefore there is an obligation to use VPR-lines (Vapour Return), which circulate the vapours in a closed circuit between the ship tanks and the shore tanks while in port. During tank cleaning the ship tanks have also to be kept inert, so that there is no risk of explosion.

Ships' Emissions

Ships' emissions to the air are governed by MARPOL Annex VI. Sources of emissions within ports are a serious concern and affect not only the environment, contributing to greenhouse gas emissions, but also potentially the health of port users and those who live and work close to the port.  Annex VI sets limits on sulphur oxide and nitrogen oxide emissions from ship exhausts and prohibits deliberate emissions of ozone depleting substances; designated emission control areas set more stringent standards for SOx, NOx and particulate matter. IMO has set a global limit for sulphur in fuel oil used on board ships of 0.50% m/m (mass by mass) from 1 January 2020. This will significantly reduce the amount of sulphur oxide from ships and should have major health and environmental benefits for the world, particularly for populations living close to ports and coasts.

Onshore power supply (OPS) is one of the strategies for reducing the environmental impact of seagoing vessels in ports. Further information can be found at the World Ports Climate Initiative website

Oil Spill Response

A port's response to an oil spill is generally in accordance with a contingency plan which sets out the organisation and procedures, information and response resources and clean-up techniques, as well as providing guidance on administrative and operational procedures involved in the preparation, mobilization, operation and termination of an oil spill response. How this is provided varies from country to country but, in general terms, the plan deals with the immediate effects of the oil spill and aims to minimise the short, medium and long-term impacts on the port’s customers and stakeholders. A primary objective of any response to an oil spill is to ensure that there is a return to normality as soon as possible.

OPRC

Parties to the International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Co-operation (OPRC) are required to establish measures for dealing with pollution incidents, either nationally or in co-operation with other countries. Ships are required to report incidents of pollution to coastal authorities and the convention details the actions that are then to be taken.

States which are party to OPRC 90 and OPRC-HNS (hazardous & noxious substances) Protocols are required to establish a national system for responding to oil and HNS pollution incidents, including a designated national authority, a national operational contact point and a national contingency plan. This needs to be safeguarded by a minimum level of response equipment, communications plans, regular training and exercises for which the harbour master may be responsible. Parties to the Convention are required to provide assistance to others in the event of a pollution emergency and provision is made for the reimbursement of any assistance provided.

Latest News & Events

Our picture shows a Carnival line up. Five Carnival ships are due in Durban in week commencing 24 May. (Photo: www.africaports.co.za )

No less than five Carnival Cruise ships are due to arrive in Durban between 26 and 28 May to take on bunkers and to restock depleted supplies.

These five ships are part of a group of 12 engaged in the humanitarian task of repatriating over 26,000 crew from the Carnival fleet and other companies, as well as personnel from entertainment centres ashore, who because of the coronavirus pandemic, have had their employment suddenly curtailed.

Hotel staff and entertainers

These are the entertainment staff, the onboard shop workers, beauty salon practitioners, waiters and bus boys, chefs and kitchen staff, cabin cleaners, pursers and front desk people all making up the staff working on board cruise ships.

With cruising curtailed these former employees are finally returning home to destinations like India, Myanmar, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines after having remained on board their ships for more than two months, unable to go ashore or receive visitors ever since cruising operations were suspended in mid -March. Ahead they face another three or four weeks at sea before being allowed to disembark. However, there’s something of a problem.

Call to governments

IFSMA* calls upon Governments to adopt the Framework of protocols for ensuring safe ship crew changes and travel during the COVID-19 pandemic without delay to allow ship owners and management companies to change over their dangerously tired crews.

Governments must act now in order to avoid personal injury to, and mental breakdown of, seafarers and avoid the significant risk of accidents and consequential danger to life and the environment.

Concern at IFSMA

IFSMA is receiving an increasing number of reports from its ship masters’ associations around the world concerned for the welfare and safety of crews and the increased risk with which they are operating in an already high risk environment.  Seafarers are feeling let down and abandoned by their Governments. 

Unprecedented times

Following concerns from the maritime industry, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) issued a circular to all Member States, the UN and agencies and IGOs and NGOs in consultative status with IMO.  This document concerned recommendations to Member States about measures to facilitate ship crew changes in seaports during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The IMO Secretary General has received a framework of protocols for ensuring safe ship crew changes and travel during the pandemic, proposed by a cross-section of global industry associations in consultative status with the IMO, for example: ICS, IAPH, BIMCO, IFSMA, and P&I Clubs as well as the International Air Transport Association (IATA).

Role of Harbour Master/ Port Operations Professional
Security
Port Call Optimisation
Ship image
Vessel Traffic Services
Safety
dock image
Emergency Management
Environment

Become a Member

Join the world’s premier professional body for harbour masters and receive up-to-date information on the industry and access to the members' area of the website.

Become a sponsor

Become a sponsor of the IHMA today and reap the benefits for your business:

  • Worldwide exposure
  • Prominence on the IHMA website
  • Instant access to your services and products for your existing and potential customers
  • Access to the key decision makers on marine operations in Ports – the Harbour Master
  • The opportunity to showcase your services and products at an international congress every two years

Be a part of the future of a vibrant, respected, professional and influential maritime organisation...IHMA

Download EHMC's Newsletter

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, ex vix insolens oportere accusamus, mea nulla aliquip virtute id, et commodo debitis voluptua mel. Vel ut doming scaevola, habemus gloriatur elaboraret ei pro.

Download archived

EHMC newsletter

Our Sponsors

Latest Events

Klaipeda, Lithuania
Baltic LNG & Gas forum

Capitalise on LNG and gas uptake in the Baltics

Creating greater energy security and independence. Meeting environmental regulations.

Join industry game changers who are altering the Baltic gas and LNG markets by providing greater energy security and meeting European climate change targets.

Port of Sillamäe, Estonia
EHMC 2021 Seminar

The Port of Sillamäe (SILPORT), Estonia, is the most eastern port of the EU, located only 25 km from the EU-Russian border and is one of the largest private ports in the EU. It is a relatively new, multifunctional deep-sea port. Natural depth at the quaysides of the port are sufficient for servicing the largest vessels that can enter the Baltic Sea through the Danish Straights. The port was opened for navigation in 2005 and offers an infra- and superstructure capable of handling all cargo groups from oil-products and dry bulk to containerised cargo.

Theme of the 2021 event; the Climate; ports, terminals, ships and harbour masters. Captain René Sirol, Harbour Master, Port of Sillamäe and the EHMC look forward to welcoming you in 2021. Sillamäe Port will provide shuttle busses from the airport of Tallinn to the venue. 

Hilton Canary Wharf, London
Smart Ports Summit

The Smart Ports Summit, 19-20 February 2020, brings together the experts and innovators who are addressing the real need for optimatision of global supply chains and ports to secure fast and efficient movement of goods, manage mega vessels and meet sustainability targets.
Shippers have become increasingly frustrated with lack of visibility, communication, modern equipment and technology at port hubs. Problems often arise whereby a full logistics team is not ready to receive a vessel; leading to unnecessary delays with transporting goods to their final destination.
What can ports do to be more transparent for shippers?
To overcome these difficulties, ports and their supply chains are transforming into smart port ecosystems. Key to embracing this change is the adoption of data-sharing, transparency, collaboration, fast and well-connected software and corresponding cyber security protections.

Exclusive: Introducing the Just-in-Time Arrival Concept

The pioneers behind the Just om Time Concept at the Port of Hamburg have chosen the Smart Port Summit as the venue to announce their results. Created by Wärtsilä, HVCC Hamburg Vessel Coordination Center and Carnival Maritime - the findings from these innovative stakeholders will be presented for the first time at the Summit.
Join us at the Smart Ports Summit this February to find out how the marine industry is adapting to customer demands and paving the way to a new, faster approach to handling vessels and cargo.

View the full agenda >> http://bit.ly/2Rdfz81

Our experts include innovators, ports and equipment suppliers

Jan Gardeitchik, Senior Lead Digitization/Business Development Manager, Port of Rotterdam
Arjan Kampman, Head of Digital & IT, Port of Amsterdam
Hanno Husar, Head of IT, Port of Tallinn
Kyyle Flanigan, Business Analyst, Belfast Harbour
Mar Chao Lopez, Head of Commerical and Business Development, Port of Valencia
Geoff Lippitt, Business Development Director, PD Ports
Gerald Hirt, MD, Hamburg Vessel Coordination Centre
Christopher Crokall, CCO, Inchcape Shipping Services
Peter O'Shaughnessy, Chief Human Resources Officer, Port of Cork

Meet the speakers >> http://bit.ly/2Rdfz81

20% DISCOUNT

As a member of the IHMA you are entitled to an additional 20% saving.

To claim this quote your VIP code: FKT3669IHMA

Register online: http://bit.ly/2Rdfz81

Or contact Roxanna.Kashfi@informa.com

Please make sure you apply for the discount at the time of registration.  

Radisson Blu Edwardian New Providence Wharf Hotel, London
LNG Bunkering europe
LNG Bunkering Europe

 

Hilton London Tower Bridge
Salvage and wreck conference London

IHMA members can save 20% on their registration for Salvage & Wreck Removal conference, 4 – 5 December 2019, London.
The following information is provided by the conference organiser:

Kick off the festive season by attending the biggest salvage industry event of the year – Salvage & Wreck Removal conference (4 – 5 December 2019, London) – meet all the key industry stakeholders, and discuss legal and insurance issues, examine recent casualty operations and incidents, and focus on the future of salvage, new ways of working and emerging technology.

Use IHMA’s exclusive VIP code FKT3652IHMA at the checkout to save 20% on your place: http://bit.ly/36knRBO.

What’s on agenda

Casualty management case studies:

  • Hear how the ‘MSC Zoe’ incident was managed with Jason Bennett, Director EMEA, Ardent and Joram Bootsma, Project Manager, Deep BV
  • Understand the legal implications of the ‘Sanchi’ with Andrew Chamberlain, Partner, HFW, Victor Fenwick, Legal Director, HFW and Paul Walton, Shipping Technical Director, LOC

Dealing with the risks of salvage in a war zone:

Find out how to effectively manage the risks in the Straits of Hormuz and other hot spots – presentations by Helene Peter-Davies, Partner, MFB Solicitors and Jim Scorer, Secretary General, International Federation of Shipmasters' Associations (IFSMA).

New approaches to wreck removal:

Use of Quantitative Risk Assessment for assessing wreck removal with Sam Kendall-Marsden, Director of Claims, The Standard Club.

See the full agenda and speaker line-up to date: http://bit.ly/2N0Z9ir.

Networking Dinner

As part of Global Marine Casualties Week, Salvage & Wreck Removal will offer you a unique opportunity to connect with 300+ industry professionals while enjoying a relaxed atmosphere, superb three-course meal with a great selection of drinks. Find out more here: http://bit.ly/2WppauT. Register now

Places are filling up fast so secure yours while you still can. Use code FKT3652IHMA to save 20%: http://bit.ly/36knRBO.

If you have questions about the event or registration process, please email event organisers at viktoriia.derkach@knect365.com.

This block is broken or missing. You may be missing content or you might need to enable the original module.

Download the IHMA Constitution

The IHMA constitution sets out the establishment of a region of the IHMA, the committee role and authority, its formation and management.

Latest News & Events

Our picture shows a Carnival line up. Five Carnival ships are due in Durban in week commencing 24 May. (Photo: www.africaports.co.za )

No less than five Carnival Cruise ships are due to arrive in Durban between 26 and 28 May to take on bunkers and to restock depleted supplies.

These five ships are part of a group of 12 engaged in the humanitarian task of repatriating over 26,000 crew from the Carnival fleet and other companies, as well as personnel from entertainment centres ashore, who because of the coronavirus pandemic, have had their employment suddenly curtailed.

Hotel staff and entertainers

These are the entertainment staff, the onboard shop workers, beauty salon practitioners, waiters and bus boys, chefs and kitchen staff, cabin cleaners, pursers and front desk people all making up the staff working on board cruise ships.

With cruising curtailed these former employees are finally returning home to destinations like India, Myanmar, Malaysia, Indonesia and the Philippines after having remained on board their ships for more than two months, unable to go ashore or receive visitors ever since cruising operations were suspended in mid -March. Ahead they face another three or four weeks at sea before being allowed to disembark. However, there’s something of a problem.

Call to governments

IFSMA* calls upon Governments to adopt the Framework of protocols for ensuring safe ship crew changes and travel during the COVID-19 pandemic without delay to allow ship owners and management companies to change over their dangerously tired crews.

Governments must act now in order to avoid personal injury to, and mental breakdown of, seafarers and avoid the significant risk of accidents and consequential danger to life and the environment.

Concern at IFSMA

IFSMA is receiving an increasing number of reports from its ship masters’ associations around the world concerned for the welfare and safety of crews and the increased risk with which they are operating in an already high risk environment.  Seafarers are feeling let down and abandoned by their Governments. 

Unprecedented times

Following concerns from the maritime industry, the International Maritime Organization (IMO) issued a circular to all Member States, the UN and agencies and IGOs and NGOs in consultative status with IMO.  This document concerned recommendations to Member States about measures to facilitate ship crew changes in seaports during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The IMO Secretary General has received a framework of protocols for ensuring safe ship crew changes and travel during the pandemic, proposed by a cross-section of global industry associations in consultative status with the IMO, for example: ICS, IAPH, BIMCO, IFSMA, and P&I Clubs as well as the International Air Transport Association (IATA).