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Foreign flagged ships detained in the UK during January 2021

Foreign flagged ships detained in the UK during January 2021

The (UK) Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) announced on 16 February that six foreign flagged ships remained under detention in UK ports during January 2021 after failing port state control (PSC) inspection.

The list published on 16 February shows:

Sirius 1 

211gt; IMO No 8964161; Flag: Nigeria (Unknown);

Company: Ambrey Limited; Classification society: Phoenix Register of Shipping; Recognised organisation: Phoenix Register of Shipping

Date and place of detention: 7 November 2020 at Southampton

Eleven deficiencies with two grounds for detention

01213 – Evidence of basic training          Expired          Yes

01220 – Seafarers’ employment agreement (SEA)        Not as required         Yes

This vessel was still detained on 31st January 2021

Sirius 2

211gt; IMO No 8977699; Flag: Nigeria (Unknown);

Company: Ambrey Limited; Classification society: Phoenix Register of Shipping; Recognised organisation: Phoenix Register of Shipping

Date and place of detention: 12 November 2020 at Southampton

Twenty deficiencies with five grounds for detention

01329 – Report of inspection on MLC, 2006     Missing          Yes

01804 – Electrical    Unsafe           Yes

01199 – Other (certificates)            Other Yes

10126 – Record of drills and steering gear tests Not as required         Yes

01326 – Stability information booklet      Not approved           Yes

This vessel was still detained on 31January 2021

Liva Greta

851gt; IMO No 8801072; Flag: Latvia (White List)

Company: Regulus SIA; Classification society: RINA; Recognised organisation: RINA; Recognised organisation for ISM Doc: RMRS; Recognised organisation for ISM SMC: RMRS

Date and place of detention: 11 January 2020 at Birkenhead

Nine deficiencies with two grounds for detention

11113 – Launching arrangements for rescue boats       Inoperative    Yes

15150 - ISM Not as required         Yes

This vessel was still detained on 31st January 2021

Poseidon

1412gt; IMO No 7363217; Flag: Iceland (White List)

Company: Neptune EHF; Classification society: NA; Recognised organisation: NA; Recognised organisation for ISM Doc: DNV-GL; Recognised organisation for ISM SMC: N/A (SMC issued by Flag)

Date and place of detention: 19 July 2018 at Hull

Ten deficiencies with two grounds for detention

02106 – Hull damage impairing seaworthiness Holed             Yes

07113 – Fire Pumps            Insufficient Pressure             Yes

This vessel was still detained on 31st January 2021

Tecoil Polaris

1814gt; IMO No: 8883290; Flag: Russian Federation (Grey List)

Company: Tecoil Shipping Ltd; Classification society: RMRS; Recognised organisation: RMRS; Recognised organisation for ISM DOC: RMRS; Recognised organisation for ISM SMC: RMRS

Date and place of detention: 6 June 2018 at Immingham

Twenty-seven deficiencies with six grounds for detentions

10104 - Gyro compass       Inoperative    Yes

10127 – Voyage or passage plan Not as required         Yes

15150 – ISM            Not as required         Yes

11104 - Rescue boats          Not properly maintained     Yes

11101 – Lifeboats    Not ready for use     Yes

01117 – International Oil Pollution Prevention (IOPP) Invalid            Yes

This vessel was still detained on 31 January 2021

Cien Porciento (General Cargo)

106gt; IMO No: 8944446; Flag: Unregistered.

Company: Open Window Inc; Classification society: Unclassed.; Recognised organisation: Not applicable; Recognised organisation for ISM DOC: Not applicable; Recognised organisation for ISM SMC: Not applicable

Date and place of detention: 4 March 2010, Lowestoft

Summary: Thirty deficiencies including seven grounds for detention

This vessel was still detained on 31 January 2021

The origins of Port State Control

In response to one of the recommendations of Lord Donaldson’s inquiry into the prevention of pollution from merchant shipping, and in compliance with the EU Directive on Port State Control (2009/16/EC as amended), the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) publishes details of the foreign flagged vessels detained in UK ports each month.

The UK is part of a regional agreement on port state control known as the Paris Memorandum of Understanding on Port State Control (Paris MOU) and information on all ships that are inspected is held centrally in an electronic database known as THETIS. This allows the ships with a high risk rating and poor detention records to be targeted for future inspection.

Inspections of foreign flagged ships in UK ports are undertaken by surveyors from the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. When a ship is found to be not in compliance with applicable convention requirements, a deficiency may be raised. If any of their deficiencies are so serious, they have to be rectified before departure, then the ship will be detained.

All deficiencies should be rectified before departure.

During January, there were no new detentions of foreign flagged vessels in a UK port.

Details obtained per www.gov.uk

Illustration per www.gov.uk ©

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