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NATIONAL MARITIME TRANSPORT TRAINING IN KENYANATIONAL MARITIME TRANSPORT TRAINING IN KENYA
Added: 18 May 2018
Kenya’s National Maritime Transport Policy concept is being promoted by IMO as a good governance practice to guide planning, decision making and legislation in the maritime sector. It can also be a key driver for a country’s sustainable development, particularly when it comes to the blue economy.

It has been reported by IMO that officials in Kenya participated in a workshop in Kilifi from 9-11 May in order to gain knowledge and understanding of the development and content of a National Maritime Transport Policy. This workshop was aimed at highlighting the involvement of the different stakeholders involved in the maritime sector.

This event, organized by IMO, in cooperation with the World Maritime University (WMU), was attended by representatives from a wide array of ministries, departments and agencies and other stakeholders, whose mandate and activities impact on the maritime sector in Kenya.

The State Department for Maritime and Shipping Affairs within the Ministry of Transport, Infrastructure, Housing and Urban Development hosted the workshop, with the support of a number of organisations including the Kenya Maritime Authority (KMA). Also participating were three Members of Parliament from the National Assembly of Kenya who are members of Parliament’s Transport, Public Works & Housing Committee, and two of the Committee’s staff.

Delivery of the workshop was facilitated by IMO’s Jonathan Pace and WMU’s Associate Professors Raphael Baumler and George Theocharidis.
 
PROGRESS ON SAFETY OF DOMESTIC FERRIESPROGRESS ON SAFETY OF DOMESTIC FERRIES
Added: 16 May 2018
Progress on safety of domestic ferries - Pacific Islands
IMO PNG forum held April 2018

Domestic ship services are a major part of the transport system in Pacific island countries. To address key concerns surrounding the safety of domestic ferries, a three-day IMO event was held in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea from 23 to 25 April.

One major outcome of the forum, it is reported, was the adoption of a community-based approach which aims to involve end users of domestic ship services to improve awareness as well as to enhance safety measures.

Under the theme: Supporting Safe Shipping to Protect Safety of Life and Environment, the third domestic ship safety forum also looked at the progress made in implementing the 2012 Suva Action Plan*, which aims to bring safer ferry operations throughout the region.

IMO’s Bekir Sitki Ustaoglu, Head Asia-Pacific of IMO Technical Co-operation Division commented: ‘The dependence of Pacific Islanders on inter-island shipping is of paramount importance and every effort must be made by government and industry alike to ensure that only safe ships sail.’

The Forum reiterated that all stakeholders in the Pacific are committed to working towards ensuring that all vessels operate in a sound and safe condition, posing no danger to the lives of those on board or to the marine environment.

Over 100 participants from Pacific Island countries and territories** as well as local stakeholders from the industry participated in the forum. They shared experiences and agreed on solutions to deal with emerging and persistent issues in relation to domestic shipping safety in the Pacific and discussed the responsibilities of ship operators and maritime administrations.

The forum was organized by IMO in collaboration with the Pacific Community (SPC) and the National Maritime Safety Authority (NMSA) of Papua New Guinea.

Also addressed was the International Safety Management (ISM) Code, which provides an international standard for the safe management and operation of ships and for pollution prevention.

A workshop was conducted to enhance awareness of the ISM Code in the South Pacific Community. This event discussed the socio-economic, political, and cultural specifics of the region. Participants were encouraged put forward their thoughts about issues that specifically impacted upon domestic ferry safety in their respective administrations. The interactive workshop allowed participants to understand the challenges in their own region but also to facilitate learning and sharing experiences from other regions.

*See here: http://www.imo.org/en/OurWork/TechnicalCooperation/TCActivities/Documents/Action%20Plan%20Pacific%20Forum%20on%20Domestic%20Ship%20Safety_FINAL.pdf

** Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru, New Zealand, Palau, Papua New Guinea, Solomon Islands, Tuvalu and Vanuatu.
Attached File: Action Plan Pacific Forum on Domestic Ship Safety_FINAL.pdf
 
IMO AND INDIAN OCEAN SECURITYIMO AND INDIAN OCEAN SECURITY
Added: 15 May 2018
Signatory States to an agreement aimed at repressing piracy, armed robbery and illicit maritime activity in the western Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Aden have agreed that building response capability and information sharing are vital steps towards achieving a safe and secure maritime environment. This was reported from IMO on 11 May.

Signatories to the revised Code of Conduct known as the Jeddah Amendment to the Djibouti Code of Conduct 2017, met in the port city from 7-10 May.

Convened by IMO with the theme: Taking Action to Enhance Regional Maritime Security, the workshop discussed the next steps in implementing the Djibouti Code of Conduct and its 2017 Jeddah Amendments, in order to strengthen regional cooperation and information sharing to ensure safe and secure regional waters.

A Royal host
This workshop, held at the Mohammed bin Naif Academy for Maritime Science and Security Studies in Jeddah, was hosted by the Border Guard of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, by kind permission of HRH Prince AbdulAziz bin Saud bin Naif bin AbdulAziz, Minister of Interior of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It was opened by Vice-Admiral Awwad Eid Al-Balawi, Director General of the Border Guard of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, and Chris Trelawny, Special Advisor to the Secretary-General of IMO.

Solution required
Participants agreed that piracy off the coast of Somalia is contained, but continues to be a threat. A long term comprehensive solution is required that also addresses other maritime security issues. These could include transnational organised crimes, including smuggling of people, trafficking of drugs, weapons, wildlife, and charcoal, illegal, unregulated and unreported fishing, violent extremism and maritime terrorism, including the risk of attacks against oil and gas installations and transport systems.

Delegates also emphasized the need to consider good maritime security as a prerequisite for a well-developed maritime sector in the region and for a thriving blue economy within the context of sustainable development goals.

Furthermore, participants re-emphasised their commitment to developing capability, legal frameworks and inter-agency cooperation at national level as the foundation for effective regional cooperation in tackling maritime insecurity. This will allow countries to develop and strengthen opportunities provided by the blue economy for the well-being of their respective population.

Information sharing could include data related to maritime crimes, best practices, legal frameworks, training programmes and national initiatives that will lead to enhanced maritime domain awareness – the effective understanding of what happens at sea and effective maritime security.

Following a range of presentations, participants and observer delegations witnessed a large-scale exercise and demonstration by the Border Guard of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia which included a number of maritime-focussed scenarios.

Briefings by all participants on national achievements and plans provided an opportunity for experience sharing and lessons learned, to enhance alignment of national plans with regional plans and to facilitate requests for external assistance from development partners.

Jeddah MRCC
Participants and observer delegations also benefitted from a visit to the state-of-the-art Jeddah Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) and received a demonstration of its capabilities. Delegations also had the opportunity to visit the excellent training facilities and instructors at the Mohammed bin Naif Academy for Maritime Science and Security Studies which have facilitated the provision of high quality training to maritime security practitioners throughout the region.


Representation
Delegates attending represented: Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, France, Jordan, Kenya, Madagascar, Maldives, Mauritius, Mozambique, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Seychelles, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania and Yemen.

Observers attended from: Denmark, Japan, Norway, United Kingdom and United States. Representatives also attended from the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime (UNODC) and the European Union, the Indian Ocean Commission, the International Criminal Police Organisation (INTERPOL), the East Africa Standby Force and the One Earth Future Foundation.

Finally, participants welcomed the capacity building work of international organisations, including IMO, INTERPOL, and the UNODC, as well as non-governmental organizations, including the One Earth Future Foundation’s Stable Seas project and the SafeSeas initiative led by Cardiff University.




Donors acknowledged
Donors were thanked, in particular Japan and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia for their contributions to the Djibouti Code of Conduct Trust Fund administered by IMO.

Further donations were requested to support the implementation of the Code, including assistance to the Djibouti Regional Training Centre.
 
AMSA PORT STATE CONTROL REPORT 2017AMSA PORT STATE CONTROL REPORT 2017
Added: 14 May 2018
Australia has one of the largest mixed market economies and is the largest continental landmass in the world surrounded by water. Therefore, Australia’s national livelihood remains focused on ensuring maritime trade to and from the country remains safe, efficient and complies with all relevant international conventions. Australia relies on sea transport for 99% of its exports, which equates to around 10% of the world’s seaborne trade.

Port State control (PSC) is an essential element in this process and Australia is renowned for having a rigorous and effective PSC control regime.

In May AMSA issued its report for PSC activities in 2017. This document summarises the PSC activities of the Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA) and reports on the performance of commercial shipping companies, flag States and Classification Societies for the 2017 calendar year.

AMSA is a statutory authority established under the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Act 1990 (the AMSA Act).

AMSA’s principal functions are:

• Promoting maritime safety and protection of the marine environment.

• Preventing and combatting ship-sourced pollution in the marine environment.

• Providing infrastructure to support safety of navigation in Australian waters.

• Providing a national search and rescue service to the maritime and aviation sectors.

In order to meet government and community expectations, AMSA is empowered to perform an enforcement function for maritime trade through the implementation of rigorous flag State control (FSC) and PSC regimes. Operation of professional, consistent FSC and PSC regimes is essential in ensuring vessels comply with minimum standards in a manner that promotes maritime safety, seafarer welfare and protection of Australia’s 60,000-kilometre coastline (including 12,000 islands) from environmental damage.

AMSA works closely in cooperation with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and PSC partner nations across the Asia-Pacific and Indian Ocean regions, sharing PSC information and actively participating in international policy development. These efforts are aimed at ensuring AMSA remains a transparent, trusted and consistent member of the maritime community.
Under the FSC programme, AMSA is responsible for operational safety standards of Australian-registered ships wherever they may be in the world.

As information on PSC activities is used by a diverse customer base on a regular basis, AMSA supplies current information via the website (www.amsa.gov.au ), including monthly ship detentions, ongoing PSC activities, current shipping trends and emerging issues. In its round the clock operations, AMSA identifies and promulgates government regulation and important marine observations through marine orders and marine notices respectively.

Introduction to Port State Control 2017 Report
The PSC inspection results for 2017 indicated a significant fall in the detention rate to 5.3%. This result is notable as it is the lowest since the 2006 detention rate of 4.5% with 138 detentions from 3080 inspections. This result is also reflected in the average number of deficiencies per inspection remaining at a low of 2.3. This outcome was last recorded in 2004. The decrease in the detention rate and low number of deficiencies per inspection emphasises the benefit in maintaining a consistent, firm, but fair, PSC inspection regime.

Summary of PSC activity
A glance at the report indicates that in the calendar year 2017 there were 28,502 ship arrivals by 5,873 foreign-flagged ships. PSC inspections totalling 3,128 were made and 165 ship detentions resulted. Bulk carriers accounted for 50.3% of ship arrivals and 55.4% of PSC inspections. The average gross tonnage per visit was 51,612gt compared with 50,505gt in 2016. PSC inspections were carried out in 54 Australian ports. The average age of vessels in 2017 was nine years compared to nine years in 2016 and ten years in 2015. AMSA surveyors conducted 7,230 inspections of all types in 2017 compared to 8,576 in 2016. It is understood that this decrease was achieved through better targeting of ships to focus on higher risk vessels.

Ships and operators who consistently perform poorly can be banned from entering or using Australian ports under section 246 of the Navigation Act1. In 2017 AMSA banned three ships for periods of from three to twelve months. Two of the bans involved significant breaches of the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006 (MLC).

The PSC processes used for the MLC are well established as this convention has been in effect since 13 August 2013. It appears that the general understanding of what is expected with respect to MLC compliance has improved. This has resulted in a reduction in the total number of MLC deficiencies and deficiencies per inspection from 2014 to 2017.

AMSA continues to focus on MLC in order to protect the welfare of seafarers and improve outcomes in this area.

Port State Control 2017 Report is available as a pdf here: https://www.amsa.gov.au/vessels-operators/port-state-control/port-state-control-report-2017

Editorial Note
The source for the material reproduced here is gratefully acknowledged as: Australian Maritime Safety Authority Port State Control 2017 Report Australia.

1In exercising this power it is important to note that AMSA only employs this mechanism where normal PSC intervention has not been effective in achieving a lasting change in behaviour. It is only used where a systemic failure has been identified. The essential intent of the process is to improve performance rather than simply remove problem vessels from Australian ports
 
BRIT NAV SAT?BRIT NAV SAT?
Added: 08 May 2018
UK Space Agency leads work on options
An independent satellite system

According to a recent statement the UK Space Agency1 will lead work to develop options for a British Global Navigation Satellite System. This was confirmed by the Government on 2 May as it develops options for a British Global Navigation Satellite System.

Led by the UK Space Agency, a taskforce of Government specialists and industry will work quickly to develop options that will provide both civilian and encrypted signals and be compatible with the GPS system.

It is reported that the UK is already a world-leader in developing satellite technology, building 40% of the world’s small satellites and one in four commercial telecommunications satellites.

Down the years UK companies have made a critical contribution to the EU Galileo programme, building the payloads for the satellites and developing security systems. This taskforce will draw on this experience and expertise as it develops plans for an innovative system that could deliver on the UK’s security needs and provide commercial services.

Business Secretary Greg Clark commented: ‘This taskforce will develop options for an independent satellite navigation system using the world-beating expertise of Britain’s thriving space sector. We have made our position clear to the European Commission and highlighted the importance of the UK to the Galileo programme. It is now right that we explore alternative options to ensure our security needs are met as we continue to take full advantage of the opportunities that exist in the global space sector, through our modern Industrial Strategy.’

It is understood that the UK will be able to use Galileo’s open signal in the future, and British Armed Forces and emergency services were due to have access to the encrypted system when it is fully operational.

The Government has been clear there is a mutual benefit to the UK remaining involved in Galileo and is working hard to deliver this. Without the assurance that UK industry can collaborate on an equal basis and without continued access to the necessary security-related information, the UK could be obliged to end its participation in the project.

The Business Secretary Greg Clark wrote to the European Commission in April 2018 expressing concern about its intention to exclude the UK from the secure elements of Galileo. The UK Space Agency has been engaging regularly with the UK companies involved and will now lead the work to develop potential alternative options.

The recent Blackett review2 estimated that a failure of navigation satellite service could cost the UK economy £1 billion a day. Resilient and secure positioning, navigation and timing information is increasingly essential for defence, critical national infrastructure and emergency response.

The UK Space Agency is driving the growth of the space sector as part of the Government’s Industrial Strategy with major initiatives including the National Space Test Facility at Harwell, and the UK continues to be a leading member of the European Space Agency, which is independent of the EU.

New figures released on 2 May by the ADS Group trade body3 show that in 2017 the UK space industry was worth around £15 billion a year in turnover, with exports of £5.4 billion and 71% growth since 2012.

1 See https://www.gov.uk/government/organisations/uk-space-agency
2 Satellite-derived Time and Position: a Study of Critical Dependencies exploring our dependency on global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). See: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/676675/satellite-derived-time-and-position-blackett-review.pdf
3 Representing aerospace, defence, security & space sectors, see: https://www.adsgroup.org.uk )

Picture caption
London pictured from the International Space Station.
Photo: ESA/Tim Peake ©
 
GROUNDINGS MADE BY BULK CARRIER OCEAN PREFECTGROUNDINGS MADE BY BULK CARRIER OCEAN PREFECT
Added: 07 May 2018
Ahmed Bin Rashid Port, Umm Al Qaywayn, United Arab Emirates
10 June 2017
Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) report issued

Summary
On 10 June 2017, the UK registered bulk carrier Ocean Prefect grounded when approaching Ahmed Bin Rashid Port, in Umm Al Qaywayn, United Arab Emirates. The vessel was not damaged and was re-floated 12 hours later.

During a second attempted entry into the port the following day, Ocean Prefect again grounded but, despite the breaching of three ballast tanks, the vessel continued to its berth. Two harbour pilots were on board during the groundings. There were no injuries or pollution.

Safety lessons

• The pilots had very limited local knowledge.

• The effect of a tidal set was contributory to both groundings.

• Tidal stream data for the port’s approaches was very limited.

• The positions of the navigation marks used to indicate the limits of the
port’s approach channel were potentially misleading.

• The port in Umm Al Qaywayn lacked resource and marine expertise.

Action taken
The MAIB has presented the safety issues identified in Ocean Prefect’s
groundings to the Director of Maritime Transport Affairs of the UAE Federal Transport Authority (FTA).

The Government of Umm Al Qaywayn has awarded a concession to the Hong Kong-based port operators, Hutchison Ports, to operate the container and bulk terminal facility at Ahmed Bin Rashid Port in Umm Al Qaywayn (UAQ).

The Port Authority has agreed with the UAE Transport Authority that:

• Pilotage for vessels calling at the container and bulk terminal facility will be arranged only through the port authority.

• The port authority will provide navigational information to visiting vessels.

• Leading lights will be established in the approach channel.

• Vessel movements will be controlled and a port control facility will be
established.

• A hydrographic survey of the port and its approaches will be conducted.

• Aids to navigation will be upgraded.

V Ships (Asia) Private Limited has issued a safety bulletin detailing the circumstances of Ocean Prefect’s groundings in Umm Al Qaywayn, which included lessons for Masters / Bridge Teams.

Recommendations
In view of the actions already taken, no recommendations have been made.

The MAIB Report
The Marine Accident Investigation Branch report was issued on 25 April 2018 and is available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5ad877cce5274a76c13dfe3d/MAIBInvReport08_2018.pdf

Picture caption
The UK registered bulk carrier Ocean Prefect.
Photo taken from Report No 8/2018 kindly provided by MAIB.
Crown Copyright 2018 ©.
 
HAPAG-LLOYD FOCUSES ON GROWING MARKET IN AFRICAHAPAG-LLOYD FOCUSES ON GROWING MARKET IN AFRICA
Added: 03 May 2018
Port expansion in Tema will lead to further growth in Ghana

New office for West Africa officially opened in Ghana

On 2 May Hapag-Lloyd celebrated the official opening of its new office in Tema, the most important port city in Ghana. Hapag-Lloyd will now manage most of its operational activities in West Africa from this location.

In the words of Anthony Firmin, Chief Operating Officer of Hapag-Lloyd: ‘I’m very pleased that our enhanced presence in West Africa is showing initial signs of success. Our West Africa Express (WAX) service from and to West Africa has been operating with extraordinary success for several years and is very well received by customers. With our new East Africa Service (EAS), connecting all major trades globally via our hub in Saudi Arabia with Kenya and Tanzania, we have entered another new trade. As a result, we are tying Africa even more closely to our global network while benefiting at the same time from positive economic developments in large parts of Africa.’

The GDP of West Africa has grown significantly in the last two years, rising by an average of 6%, it is understood.
Ghana numbers among the fastest-growing economies in the region. This growth is primarily driven by the trade in gold, but also in oil and gas products. Among Ghana’s most important export goods are cocoa, timber products and cashew nuts.

Hapag-Lloyd has massively expanded its presence in Africa over the last two years and established a fast connection from West Africa to Europe via what are now two services:
The West Africa Express (WAX: Hamburg – Casablanca – Tangier – Dakar – Tema – Abidjan – Tangier – Antwerp – Hamburg).
The Mediterranean West Africa Express (MWX: Tangier – Algeciras – Cotonou – Lagos (Apapa & Pipan) – Tema – Tangier).
Both services will call at Tema.
Plans call for the port’s annual handling capacity to be tripled by mid-2019, from 1 million to 3 million TEU. Hapag-Lloyd is expecting additional growth opportunities from this capacity expansion.


About Hapag-Lloyd
With a fleet of 219 modern container ships and a total transport capacity of 1.6 million TEU, Hapag-Lloyd (www.Hapag-Lloyd.com) is one of the world’s leading liner shipping companies. The Company has around 12,500 employees and over 380 offices in 125 countries. Hapag-Lloyd has a container capacity of 2.3 million TEU – including one of the largest and most modern fleets of reefer containers. A total of 120 liner services worldwide ensure fast and reliable connections between more than 600 ports worldwide.

Picture caption
Hapag-Lloyd focuses on growing markets in Africa.

 
COLLISION BETWEEN BULK CARRIER HUAYANG ENDEABOUR AND OIL TANKER SEAFRONTIER - MAIB REPORT ISSUEDCOLLISION BETWEEN BULK CARRIER HUAYANG ENDEABOUR AND OIL TANKER SEAFRONTIER - MAIB REPORT ISSUED
Added: 27 Apr 2018
Collision between bulk carrier Huayang Endeavour and oil tanker Seafrontier - Dover Strait 1 July 2017

Marine Accident Investigation Branch (MAIB) report issued.

Summary

At 0304 on 1 July 2017, two Hong Kong registered vessels, the bulk carrier Huayang Endeavour and the oil tanker Seafrontier, collided in the Dover Strait approximately five nautical miles to the west of Sandettie Bank. Both vessels were damaged in the collision but were able to proceed to nearby ports for damage assessment. The accident did not result in any injuries or pollution.

The MAIB investigation identified that a Very High Frequency (VHF) radio conversation between the two vessels had resulted in the two bridge teams holding conflicting views as to what had been agreed regarding Huayang Endeavour overtaking Seafrontier. Subsequently, Seafrontier’s bridge team did not check for sea room astern before altering course, leading to a close quarter situation between the two vessels.

In addition, Seafrontier’s master had been present on the bridge for over 14 hours and was probably suffering from fatigue, which was likely to have had an adverse effect on his decision making.

Safety lessons

Seafrontier’s master was operating within his maximum permitted working hours however he was probably experiencing fatigue which resulted in his decision making and reaction times being affected

Huayang Endeavour’s bridge team did not complete effective long-range scanning as required by the Convention on the International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea, 1972 (COLREGs)

Use of VHF to resolve the situation was inappropriate as it did not allow sufficient time for effective action to be take, the language used was not precise or clear and it did not result in a shared plan

Seafrontier’s bridge team did not monitor Huayang Endeavour’s manoeuvres after the VHF conversation and as they did not check for sea room before altering course, were unaware of the bulk carriers actual position

Recommendations

Following its internal investigation Huayang Endeavour’s manager has amended its procedures for the use of VHF for collision avoidance, and promulgated the lessons learned from this accident to its fleet. The manager of Seafrontier, has also completed an internal investigation, and has taken a number of steps to train its personnel in bridge and crew resource management, review its procedures, and promulgated the lessons from this accident to its fleet.

In light of the actions already taken, no recommendations have been made.

The Marine Accident Investigation Branch report was issued on 25 April 2018 and is available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5ad86d01e5274a76c13dfdc1/MAIBInvReport07_2018.pdf


Website: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/media/5ad86d01e5274a76c13dfdc1/MAIBInvReport07_2018.pdf
 
FREIGHT AND BREXITFREIGHT AND BREXIT
Added: 26 Apr 2018
Different businesses have different freight-related needs. For some, the timeliness of deliveries is crucial; for others, it is the cost of moving freight. The arrangements for perishable goods will be different from raw materials for manufacturing or parts for assembly, for example.

Road haulage, maritime and aviation sectors may need to take different steps to prepare for the effects, and harness the opportunities, of Brexit. But there has been little published analysis of sector-specific freight needs.

In a new inquiry launching on 26 April the House of Commons Transport Committee is offering freight operators and their diverse customers, the opportunity to specify these needs. Though the terms of reference are wide, the Committee hopes the sector will be also be forthcoming about the issues involved.

Although UK and EU negotiators have now agreed a Brexit transitional period to run until December 2020, the pressure is on to determine just what is required – and what can be delivered in the time available – for the smooth operation of freight in the longer term.

Launching the inquiry, the Chair of the Committee, Lilian Greenwood MP, commented: ‘We have heard a lot about customs arrangements, border controls, tariffs and trade deals. But we haven’t heard enough about transport infrastructure, policy and regulatory implications affecting freight operators and their customers. But from day one after Brexit, we will all expect our goods to turn up and for life to continue as normal.

‘While the agreement of a transitional period to December 2020 is welcome, there remains a great deal of uncertainty for UK freight operators and their customers. The implications of Brexit will vary across freight modes and types of freight. We want the sector to tell us what’s worrying them. What is required to make this work?

‘We want to cast our evidence-gathering net as wide as possible, then focus our attention on areas where government and industry actions will be most pressing, to prepare for both the challenges and opportunities of Brexit.’

Terms of reference

The House of Commons Transport Committee intends to examine the potential effects of Brexit on UK freight operations and assess the preparatory steps operators, their customers and the Government need to take.

The inquiry will not consider border and customs arrangements, trade deals or tariffs as these fall outside the Committee’s remit, but will look at the steps required to prepare for the challenges and opportunities of Brexit for UK freight, particularly through investment in transport infrastructure and changes to transport policy and regulation.

The Committee is particularly interested to receive written evidence addressing the following:

· The scale and nature of the challenges and opportunities Brexit will present to UK freight companies and their customers.

· The adequacy of steps being taken by freight companies, their representative bodies, their customers and the Government in preparation for the challenges and opportunities of Brexit.

· Mode and/or sector-specific requirements for additional Government funding, or other changes to Government funding plans, particularly in relation to transport infrastructure, to support the needs of freight; and

· Any new arrangements needed for the licencing, regulation and training of operators and workers in the freight sector after Brexit (including the adequacy of measures set out in the Haulage Permits and Trailer Registration Bill).

The closing date for written submissions via the inquiry page on the Committee’s website is 8 June 2018 to be found at:

https://www.parliament.uk/business/committees/committees-a-z/commons-select/transport-committee/inquiries/parliament-2017/freight-and-brexit-17-19/

Committee Membership

Lilian Greenwood MP, Chair (Lab, Nottingham South);

Ronnie Cowan MP (SNP, Inverclyde);

Steve Double MP (Con, St Austell and Newquay);

Paul Girvan MP (DUP, South Antrim);

Huw Merriman MP (Con, Bexhill and Battle);

Grahame Morris MP (Labour, Easington);

Luke Pollard MP (Lab (Co-op), Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport);

Iain Stewart MP (Con, Milton Keynes South);

Graham Stringer MP (Lab, Blackley and Broughton);

Martin Vickers MP (Con, Cleethorpes);

Daniel Zeichner MP (Lab, Cambridge).

Guide for witnesses

https://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/witnessguide.pdf
 
IMPACT OF STRATEGIC INVESTMENT IN AFRICA’S PORTSIMPACT OF STRATEGIC INVESTMENT IN AFRICA’S PORTS
Added: 17 Apr 2018
More strategic investment in Africa’s ports can accelerate growth and development by strengthening trade - PwC report

Despite the high volumes of goods that require transport, the development and integration of ports in Africa’s wider logistic chains remains uneven, it has been reported.

It was reported from Johannesburg on 12 April that Africa needs to take advantage of the economic potential of its ports and shipping sector if it is to realise its growth ambitions.

Globally, ports are gateways for 80% of merchandise trade by volume and 70% by value. Investment in ports and their related transport infrastructure to advance trade and promote overall economic development and growth is therefore vital – particularly in emerging economies that are currently under-served by modern transportation facilities.

However, port investment must be channelled appropriately to ensure financial sustainability and economic growth. Investment is not always about building new ports or terminals – investment spent on infrastructure without cognisance of the efficiency and effectiveness of the performance of the port may not produce the desired results.

Port performance must be seen in the context of not only port infrastructure shortfalls, but also the fact that port performance has a direct impact on the efficiency and reliability of the entire transport network in which the port is just a node for the transfer of goods.

These are among the key findings of an analysis of port development in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) issued by PwC (www.PwC.com) on 12 April.

The report, Strengthening Africa’s gateways to trade, was developed in response to the challenges facing SAA’s ports in attracting external investment and highlighting the regional economic and growth benefits thereof.

Readers are invited to see here to download the report: https://goo.gl/pXBsZK

Why ports matter
As an emerging market region endowed with vast resources and a growing population, SSA must accelerate its market access and trade across the region and with the rest of the world. PwC analysis shows that a 25% improvement in port performance could increase GDP by 2%, demonstrating the close relationship between port effectiveness and trade competitiveness. With growing congestion in many African ports, Africa runs the risk of sacrificing further growth through lack of investment in port terminal infrastructure. Access to effective ports, interconnecting infrastructure and efficient operations to cope with current demand and future growth, will lead to reduced costs and improved overall freight logistics efficiency and reliability – all of which are fundamental to the region’s future success.

Despite the high volumes of goods that require transport, the development and integration of ports in Africa’s wider logistic chains remains uneven. Some ports are important generators of benefit and serve large hinterland areas, often extending beyond national borders. Others lag in terms of available facilities, reliability and efficiency in the handling of freight, which increase supply-chain costs. The disparities in performance between different ports impacts on Africa transport logistic chains, and makes African countries less competitive than they could be.

Dr. Andrew Shaw, PwC Africa Transport and Logistics Leader, commented: ‘Ports are a vital part of the supply chain in Africa, with many ports having a far-reaching hinterland often spanning a number of countries, which makes them a natural focus for regional development.

‘In this report we show that the global transportation and logistics industry can no longer afford to ignore developments in Africa. Logistics service providers and ports in particular will continue to play a key facilitator role in trade competitiveness and thus facilitate trade and sustained economic growth across the region.

‘Trade competitiveness requires governments and key stakeholders to see ports as facilitators of trade and integrators in the logistics supply chain. Efficient ports can make countries and regions more competitive and thus improve their growth prospects. The reliability and efficiency of each port terminal, including minimising delay to shippers, is critical to enhancing future trade facilitation.’


Picture caption
Dr Andrew Shaw, PwC Africa Transport and Logistics Leader.
 
IMO ADOPTS CLIMATE CHANGE STRATEGY FOR SHIPPINGIMO ADOPTS CLIMATE CHANGE STRATEGY FOR SHIPPING
Added: 16 Apr 2018
Delegates meeting at the IMO in week ending 14 April adopted an initial strategy on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from ships, setting out a vision to reduce GHG emissions and phase them out, as soon as possible this century.

This vision confirms IMO’s commitment to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and, as a matter of urgency, to phasing them out as soon as possible.

More specifically, under the identified “levels of ambition”, the initial strategy envisages for the first time a reduction in total GHG emissions from international shipping which, it says, should peak as soon as possible and to reduce the total annual GHG emissions by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008, while, at the same time, pursuing efforts towards phasing them out entirely. This was reported by IMO at the close of the gathering on 13 April.

This strategy includes a specific reference to “a pathway of CO2 emissions reduction consistent with the Paris Agreement temperature goals”.

This initial strategy was adopted by IMO’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), during its 72nd session at IMO Headquarters in London, United Kingdom. The meeting was attended by more than 100 IMO Member States.

The initial strategy represents a framework for Member States, setting out the future vision for international shipping, the levels of ambition to reduce GHG emissions and guiding principles; and includes candidate short-, mid- and long-term further measures with possible timelines and their impacts on States. The strategy also identifies barriers and supportive measures including capacity building, technical cooperation and research and development (R&D).

IMO Secretary-General Kitack Lim said the adoption of the strategy was another successful illustration of the renowned IMO spirit of cooperation and would allow future IMO work on climate change to be rooted in a solid basis.

He told delegates: ‘I encourage you to continue your work through the newly adopted Initial GHG Strategy which is designed as a platform for future actions. I am confident in relying on your ability to relentlessly continue your efforts and develop further actions that will soon contribute to reducing GHG emissions from ships.’

According to the Roadmap approved by IMO Member States in 2016, the initial strategy is due to be revised by 2023.

Continuing the momentum of work on this issue, the Committee agreed to hold the fourth Intersessional meeting of the Working Group on Reduction of GHG emissions from ships later in the year. This working group will be tasked with developing a programme of follow-up actions to the Initial Strategy; further considering how to progress reduction of GHG emissions from ships in order to advise the committee; and reporting to the next session of the MEPC (MEPC 73), which meets from 22-26 October 2018.

IMO has already adopted global mandatory measures to address the reduction in GHG emissions from ships. IMO is also executing global technical cooperation projects to support the capacity of States, particularly developing States to implement and support energy efficiency in the shipping sector.

Initial IMO strategy on the reduction of GHG emissions from ships
The initial strategy includes the following:
Vision
IMO remains committed to reducing GHG emissions from international shipping and, as a matter of urgency, aims to phase them out as soon as possible in this century.

Levels of ambition
The Initial Strategy identifies levels of ambition for the international shipping sector noting that technological innovation and the global introduction of alternative fuels and/or energy sources for international shipping will be integral to achieve the overall ambition. Reviews should take into account updated emission estimates, emissions reduction options for international shipping, and the reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Levels of ambition directing the Initial Strategy are as follows:

1. carbon intensity of the ship to decline through implementation of further phases of the energy efficiency design index (EEDI) for new ships

to review with the aim to strengthen the energy efficiency design requirements for ships with the percentage improvement for each phase to be determined for each ship type, as appropriate;

2. carbon intensity of international shipping to decline

to reduce CO2 emissions per transport work, as an average across international shipping, by at least 40% by 2030, pursuing efforts towards 70% by 2050, compared to 2008; and

3. GHG emissions from international shipping to peak and decline

to peak GHG emissions from international shipping as soon as possible and to reduce the total annual GHG emissions by at least 50% by 2050 compared to 2008 whilst pursuing efforts towards phasing them out as called for in the Vision as a point on a pathway of CO2 emissions reduction consistent with the Paris Agreement temperature goals.


Background information
The Paris Agreement
The Paris Agreement on climate change was agreed in 2015 by Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and entered into force in 2016. The Paris Agreement central aim is to strengthen the global response to the threat of climate change by keeping a global temperature rise this century well below 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels and to pursue efforts to limit the temperature increase even further to 1.5 degrees Celsius.

The Paris Agreement does not include international shipping, but IMO, as the regulatory body for the industry, is committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions from international shipping.

Background on IMO’s contribution to the global efforts to address climate change
IMO’s contribution to the global efforts to address climate change features prominently in IMO’s Strategic Plan.

In 2011, IMO became the first international body to adopt mandatory energy-efficiency measures for an entire industry sector with a suite of technical and operational requirements for new and existing vessels that entered into force in 2013. By 2025 new ships built will be 30% more energy efficient than those built in 2014.

The mandatory data collection system for fuel oil consumption of ships, which entered into force in March 2018, will provide robust data and information on which future decisions on additional measures, over and above those already adopted, can be made.

The mandatory data collection system is intended to be the first in a three-step approach in which analysis of the data collected will provide the basis for an objective, transparent and inclusive policy debate in the MEPC, under a roadmap (through to 2023) for developing a “Comprehensive IMO strategy on reduction of GHG emissions from ships”. The roadmap was agreed in 2016.

Support for implementation of IMO’s energy-efficiency measures is provided, in particular, through two major global projects executed by IMO:
• The Global Maritime Energy Efficiency Partnerships Project (GloMEEP Project) is aimed at supporting the uptake and implementation of energy efficiency measures for shipping, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions from shipping. The GloMEEP project was launched in 2015 in collaboration with the Global Environment Facility and the United Nations Development Programme. A Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (or GIA), launched in 2017 under the auspices of the GloMEEP Project, is identifying and developing solutions that can support overcoming barriers to the uptake of energy efficiency technologies and operational measures in the shipping sector.

See website: http://glomeep.imo.org/

• The global maritime technology network (GMN) project, funded by the European Union, has established a network of five Maritime Technology Cooperation Centres (MTCCs) in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America and the Pacific. Through collaboration and outreach activities at regional level, the MTCCs will focus their efforts during 2018 and beyond to help countries develop national maritime energy-efficiency policies and measures, promote the uptake of low-carbon technologies and operations in maritime transport and establish voluntary pilot data-collection and reporting systems.

See website: http://gmn.imo.org/
 
PORT SECURITY TRAINING IN DJIBOUTIPORT SECURITY TRAINING IN DJIBOUTI
Added: 10 Apr 2018
Port security training in Djibouti

Ports provide the critical interface between the ship and the shore. For maritime trade to flow effectively, this vital infrastructure needs to be secure – and this involves people at all levels.

IMO reported that a national maritime security training workshop held in Djibouti from 19 to 23 March included practical exercises and a site visit to a nearby port facility.

In addition there was class-based training in how to implement the relevant provisions of IMO’s code on International Ship and Port Facility Security (ISPS Code) and SOLAS Chapter XI-2 and related guidance.

See here: http://www.imo.org/en/ourwork/security/guide_to_maritime_security/pages/solas-xi-2%20isps%20code.aspx for a guide to the ISPS Code*.

This workshop was held at the Djibouti Regional Maritime Training Centre, Djibouti, and was aimed at port facility security officers and other port security personnel. In addition, designated maritime security officials from the Djiboutian Maritime Authority were involved in the training, to gain insight into their oversight roles and responsibilities.

The training was organized by IMO at the request of the Djiboutian Maritime Authority and was conducted by IMO’s Kiruja Micheni and a team of consultants.

*International Ship and Port Facility Code
Having entered into force under SOLAS chapter XI-2, on 1 July 2004, the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) has since formed the basis for a comprehensive mandatory security regime for international shipping. The Code is divided into two sections, Part A and Part B.

Mandatory Part A outlines detailed maritime and port security-related requirements which SOLAS contracting governments, port authorities and shipping companies must adhere to, in order to be in compliance with the Code.

Part B of the Code provides a series of recommendatory guidelines on how to meet the requirements and obligations set out within the provisions of Part A.
 
HAPAG-LLOYD OPENS OFFICE IN GHANAHAPAG-LLOYD OPENS OFFICE IN GHANA
Added: 09 Apr 2018
Presence in West Africa expanded / Investments in growing markets

Early in February Hapag-Lloyd moved into its own new office in Tema, the most important port city in Ghana and it is reported that the company is now represented at local level by its own customer service staff.

In the words of Lars Christiansen, Senior Managing Director of Hapag-Lloyd’s Region Middle East: ‘Africa is strongly developing just now. To benefit from this growth, it is important for us to strengthen our presence in Ghana with our own office – and to get even closer to our local customers. On top of that, with our new East Africa Service, we have entered a new trade with which we will connect Africa even closer to our global network.’

West Africa has recorded significant growth in the last two years, with gross domestic product (GDP) rising by six per cent on average. Hapag-Lloyd has invested in the region and established a fast connection to Europe via two services: the West Africa Express (WAX, Hamburg – Casablanca – Tangier – Dakar – Tema – Abidjan – Tangier – Antwerp – Hamburg) and the Mediterranean West Africa Express (MWX, Tangier – Algeciras – Cotonou – Lagos (Apapa & Tincan) – Tema – Tangier). Both services started in the end of 2017.

Tema is a port of call of both services, and it will become even more important once a major port-expansion project is completed in mid-2019, thereby boosting capacity from one million to three million TEU.

Steen Morch Petersen, HAPAG’s Managing Director Ghana, is heading the new office with 26 staff members. He previously worked for OMA Group, a shipping agency specializing in West Africa. He will be supported by Pregasan Pather who has moved from Hapag-Lloyd’s Durban office to Ghana as Cluster Operations Director.

Among Ghana’s most important export goods are cocoa, timber products and cashew nuts.
 
INTERACTION BETWEEN OFFSHORE WIND FARMS AND MARITIME NAVIGATIONINTERACTION BETWEEN OFFSHORE WIND FARMS AND MARITIME NAVIGATION
Added: 08 Apr 2018
PIANC or the World Association for Waterborne Transport Infrastructure announced early in April that its MarCom Working Group report 161, Interaction Between Offshore Wind Farms and Maritime Navigation, has been released.

The objective of this report is to provide information and recommendations on good practice. Conformity is not obligatory and engineering judgement should be used in its application, especially in special circumstances. This report should be seen as an expert guidance and state of the art on this particular subject. PIANC disclaims all responsibility in case this report should be presented as an official standard.

Price € 95,00 (€ 35,00 for students).

Interaction Between Offshore Wind Farms and Maritime Navigation provides an approach, guidelines and recommendations to assess the required manoeuvring space for ships in the vicinity of offshore wind farms (OWF) and the minimum recommended distance between shipping lanes and sea areas for OWF in order to ensure a minimal risk to navigation.

Furthermore, the document specifically addresses issues with OWF regarded as a subset of Offshore Renewable Energy Installations (OREI) and some of the recommendations will have a wider application to other OREI.

This report provides references to international conventions and regulations.

Additionally it:

· Provides guidelines to define an appropriate safe distance to navigation for different situations.

· Describes the electromagnetic radiation effect on radio navigation and radio communication systems.

· Indicates mitigating measures to be taken into account for the safe navigation of shipping.

· Covers emergency situations that may occurred within or close to an OWF.

Further information can be found at: www.pianc.org/technicalreportsbrowseall
 
ENHANCING THE SHIP/SHORE INTERFACE IN MOZAMBIQUEENHANCING THE SHIP/SHORE INTERFACE IN MOZAMBIQUE
Added: 06 Apr 2018
IMO’s Facilitation Convention

When the communication between ships and port is smoothly run, shipments move more quickly, more easily and more efficiently. This is where IMO’s Facilitation Convention comes in. The FAL* convention contains standards and recommended practices and rules for simplifying formalities, documentary requirements and procedures on ships’ arrival, stay and departure.

Benefits of ratification and implementation of the FAL Convention were highlighted during a National Seminar on Facilitation of Maritime Traffic held from 27 to 29 March in Maputo, Mozambique. The aim was to support Mozambique to ratify the Convention, including its latest amendments. Participants were advised on the benefits of using the maritime single window and electronic data interchange to facilitate ship clearance.

IMO’s Julian Abril and IMO consultants were at the seminar, which was organized by IMO and the Instituto Nacional da Marinha (INAMAR).

It was attended by 50 participants from ministries with responsibilities in the clearance of ships, cargo, crew and passengers at ports of Mozambique, and private stakeholders (Escola Superior de Ciências Náuticas, Portos do Norto, LBH Mozambique LDA, MPDC Maputo Port, Ovarah Mutheko Serviços Sociedade, CLN Corredor Logistico Integrado Nacala, PIL Mozambique Bollore Transport Logis).

* The FAL Convention
Members of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted in 1965 the Convention of Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic, the so-called FAL Convention.

The convention entered into force on 5 March 1967 and has been amended 13 times so far (1969, 1973, 1977, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005, 2009).

With this convention members aimed at facilitating maritime transport by simplifying and minimizing the formalities, data requirements and procedures associated with arrival, stay and departure of ships engaged in international voyage.

To this end the Annex to the FAL Convention contains Standards and Recommended Practices on formalities, documentary requirements and procedures which should be applied on arrival, during their stay, and on departure to the ships, their crews, passengers, baggage
and cargo. It reduces to nine the number of declarations which can be required by public authorities.

These standardized forms include, inter alia, the IMO General Declaration, the Cargo Declaration, and the Crew and Passenger Lists, and Dangerous Goods Declaration.

Valuable Introductory Information on the Convention can be found here: http://www.imo.org/en/OurWork/Facilitation/ConventionsCodesGuidelines/Pages/Default.aspx

The FAL Committee approved in 2010 an explanatory manual to the Convention that contains guidance and interpretation of the provisions of the annex of the FAL Convention, assists in interpreting the legal text of the provisions and provides for a greater understanding of the Convention. The explanatory manual was circulated as FAL.3/Circ.202.
Enhancing ship/shore interface in Mozambique
IMO’s Facilitation Convention

When the communication between ships and port is smoothly run, shipments move more quickly, more easily and more efficiently. This is where IMO’s Facilitation Convention comes in. The FAL* convention contains standards and recommended practices and rules for simplifying formalities, documentary requirements and procedures on ships’ arrival, stay and departure.

Benefits of ratification and implementation of the FAL Convention were highlighted during a National Seminar on Facilitation of Maritime Traffic held from 27 to 29 March in Maputo, Mozambique. The aim was to support Mozambique to ratify the Convention, including its latest amendments. Participants were advised on the benefits of using the maritime single window and electronic data interchange to facilitate ship clearance.

IMO’s Julian Abril and IMO consultants were at the seminar, which was organized by IMO and the Instituto Nacional da Marinha (INAMAR).

It was attended by 50 participants from ministries with responsibilities in the clearance of ships, cargo, crew and passengers at ports of Mozambique, and private stakeholders (Escola Superior de Ciências Náuticas, Portos do Norto, LBH Mozambique LDA, MPDC Maputo Port, Ovarah Mutheko Serviços Sociedade, CLN Corredor Logistico Integrado Nacala, PIL Mozambique Bollore Transport Logis).

* The FAL Convention
Members of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) adopted in 1965 the Convention of Facilitation of International Maritime Traffic, the so-called FAL Convention.

The convention entered into force on 5 March 1967 and has been amended 13 times so far (1969, 1973, 1977, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1992, 1993, 1996, 1999, 2002, 2005, 2009).

With this convention members aimed at facilitating maritime transport by simplifying and minimizing the formalities, data requirements and procedures associated with arrival, stay and departure of ships engaged in international voyage.

To this end the Annex to the FAL Convention contains Standards and Recommended Practices on formalities, documentary requirements and procedures which should be applied on arrival, during their stay, and on departure to the ships, their crews, passengers, baggage
and cargo. It reduces to nine the number of declarations which can be required by public authorities.

These standardized forms include, inter alia, the IMO General Declaration, the Cargo Declaration, and the Crew and Passenger Lists, and Dangerous Goods Declaration.

Valuable Introductory Information on the Convention can be found here: http://www.imo.org/en/OurWork/Facilitation/ConventionsCodesGuidelines/Pages/Default.aspx

The FAL Committee approved in 2010 an explanatory manual to the Convention that contains guidance and interpretation of the provisions of the annex of the FAL Convention, assists in interpreting the legal text of the provisions and provides for a greater understanding of the Convention. The explanatory manual was circulated as FAL.3/Circ.202.


 
BOOSTING GULF OF GUINEA MARITIME SECURITY CAPABILITYBOOSTING GULF OF GUINEA MARITIME SECURITY CAPABILITY
Added: 05 Apr 2018
Boosting Gulf of Guinea maritime security capability

IMO participated in an annual maritime security exercise aimed at improving interoperability and cooperation among the maritime forces of Gulf of Guinea nations, Europe, and North and South America. The 2018 Obangame Express exercise held from 21 to 29 March put special emphasis on encouraging navies and civilian agencies and countries to work together, as envisaged in existing frameworks such as the Yaoundé Code of Conduct – a regional agreement against maritime crime in the Gulf of Guinea, which IMO helped to establish.

IMO’s Chris Trelawny contributed to a Senior Leadership Symposium, in Libreville, Gabon, organized by the United States Naval War College in the margins of Obangame Express. Mr Trelawny addressed the symposium on the theme of ‘the Yaoundé Code of Conduct – Linking maritime security and development’.

IMO also participated in the 2018 Cutlass Express maritime security exercise, which took place in February in the vicinity of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Mombasa, Kenya; and the Seychelles.

Participants in Obangame Express 2018 also include: Angola, Belgium, Benin, Brazil, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Canada, Cote d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Denmark, France, Gabon, Gambia, Germany, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Morocco, Namibia, Netherlands, Nigeria, Portugal, Republic of Congo, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Spain, Togo, Turkey and the United States, as well as the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS).


 
FACE-TO-FACE MEETING TO TALK ABOUT THE OCEANSFACE-TO-FACE MEETING TO TALK ABOUT THE OCEANS
Added: 04 Apr 2018
Ensuring that the many positive initiatives to protect the world’s oceans are working in synergy is a key task for UN-Oceans, a UN interagency coordination mechanism for ocean issues. The group held its 17th annual face-to-face meeting from 26 to 28 March hosted by the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO in Paris.

This meeting has allowed UN-Oceans member organisations to exchange information on current and forthcoming activities, and to identify synergies for further collaboration. Participants also discussed how the outcomes of The Ocean Conference, including the 1400 voluntary commitments, are fully analysed and implemented.

It is understood that the meeting also shared ideas on how to coalesce and encourage their activities in support of the implementation of Sustainable Development Goal 14.

The International Decade of Ocean Science for Sustainable Development 2021-2030 also featured on the agenda to ensure ocean science can fully support countries in the achievement of SDG 14. The event concluded with reviewing the UN-Oceans terms of reference as well as its future work programme for 2018. IMO was represented by Fredrik Haag, Head, Office for London Convention/Protocol and Ocean Affairs.
 
 UNCTAD CONTAINER SHIPPING FORECAST
Added: 02 Apr 2018
UNCTAD container shipping forecast - A report for UNCTAD

Global container shipping to face yet another crisis?

That is the title of a paper written by Professor José Paul and published on 12 March. It is available as Article No. 15 part of UNCTAD Transport and Trade Facilitation Newsletter N°77 - First Quarter 2018.

The year 2017 saw a modest recovery in container shipping after a disastrous performance in 2016. According to Drewry maritime research and consulting services, the container shipping industry has lost about US$ 10 billion in 2016.

In August 2016, container shipping line Hanjin Shipping of South Korea declared bankruptcy, leaving 66 ships carrying goods worth US$ 14.5 billion stranded at sea. These developments sent shock waves through the container shipping industry.

The author, Dr José Paul, has a doctorate in port management from the University of Wales, Cardiff, (UK), a former Acting Chairman of J N Port, Mumbai and a former Chairman of Mormugao Port Trust. He is currently working as Adjunct Professor of Maritime Studies, AMET University in Chennai, India.

Dr Paul’s paper Global container shipping to face yet another crisis? is available here:

http://unctad.org/en/pages/newsdetails.aspx?OriginalVersionID=1681&utm_source=UNCTAD+Transport+and+Trade+Facilitation+Newsletter&utm_campaign=22cf4b727f EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2017_09_18&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_f6141a63dd-22cf4b727f-44492937
Attached File: NL 020 CONTAINER SHIPPING REPORT.jpg
 
 THE UK CHAMBER OF SHIPPING’S JOURNAL
Added: 27 Mar 2018
The UK Chamber of Shipping launched its 2018 Journal at its Annual General Meeting in London on 15 March.

Journal looks at the Chamber’s strategic ambitions for the year ahead, as well as progress made so far, and can be downloaded as a PDF here: https://www.ukchamberofshipping.com/library/uk-chamber-journal-2018/
Attached File: Journal_2018_double_page_spread_view-1.pdf
 
Greenfield Port of Banana,  Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)Greenfield Port of Banana, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)
Added: 26 Mar 2018
This was reported from DPW’s Dubai HQ, in UAE, on 25 March along with an indication that this multi-purpose facility is to serve as the first deep-water port in the country.

Furthermore, the 30-year concession has an option of a further 20-year extension for the management and development of a green field multi-purpose port project at Banana, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). The Port of Banana will be the first deep-sea port in the country along its small coastline of 37 kilometres, which currently only has the riverine port of Matadi.

DPW’s initial investment of $350 million will be spread over 24 months, it is understood, and the total project cost of more than $1 billion over four phases will be dependent on market demand for the port, industrial and logistics zone infrastructure.

DP World will set up a joint venture with 70% control, and the government of DRC holding a 30% share, to manage and invest in the Port of Banana.

The first phase of the green field project, with an estimated initial investment of $350 million, will include a 600-metre quay and 25-hectare yard extension with a container capacity of 350,000 TEU and 1.5 million tons for general cargo. Construction is expected to start in 2018 and is expected to take approximately 24 months to complete.

The initial investment of $350 million will be spread over 24 months and the total project cost of more than $1 billion over four phases will be dependent on market demand for the port, industrial and logistics zone infrastructure. The development gives the Democratic Republic of the Congo the opportunity to be connected into global trade lanes, to have access to a wide range of global markets and to reduce its dependency on neighbouring countries’ ports.

Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, Group Chairman and CEO, DP World, commented: ‘We are delighted to extend our African footprint further with a major investment in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, which is Africa’s third-most populous country but has no direct deep-sea port. Investment in this deep-water port will have a major impact on the country’s trade with significant cost and time savings, attracting more direct calls from larger vessels from Asia and Europe, and ultimately acting as a catalyst for the growth of the country and the region’s economy.

‘DP World has become a major player in Africa and the Port of Banana will contribute to our global network and continued growth in the developing markets. We are confident that this investment will deliver attractive returns to shareholders over the longer-term and we look forward to bringing DP World’s world class productivity-enhancing, security, safety and environmental best practices in container terminal development and operation to the Democratic Republic of the Congo.’

José Makila Sumanda, Vice Prime Minister and Minister of Transport and Communications, Democratic Republic of the Congo, added: ‘We are excited to partner with DP World on this landmark project. The Port of Banana will offer the first deep-water port to the Democratic Republic of the Congo that will dramatically improve the cost and time of trade as the majority of the cargo is still handled by neighbouring countries.

‘The project will provide us with a first-class marine facility comparable to other African countries in terms of capacity, draft and ability to handle the latest generation of vessels.’

‘The country was waiting for this strategic and structural project for a long time. We are confident that with DP World as a partner, we will be able to meet the expectations of our people, traders and exporters to have access to more markets and to bring more efficiency and cost effectiveness to international trade.’


About DP World
DP World has a portfolio of 78 operating marine and inland terminals supported by over 50 related businesses in over 40 countries across six continents with a significant presence in both high-growth and mature markets. DPW has a dedicated team of over 36,000 employees from 103 countries cultivating long-standing relationships with governments, shipping lines, importers and exporters, communities, and many other important constituents of the global supply chain.

Container handling is the company’s core business and generates more than three quarters of its revenue. In 2017, DP World handled 70.1 million TEU across its
portfolio. With its committed pipeline of developments and expansions, the current gross capacity of 88.2 million TEU is expected to rise to more than 100 million TEU by 2020, in line with market demand.

Picture caption
At left, Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, Group Chairman and CEO, DP World and José Makila Sumanda, Vice-Prime Minister and Minister of Transport and Communications, Democratic Republic of the Congo, at the signing of the Port of Banana concession in the Democratic Republic of the Congo
 
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